Book Review: The Vacationers by Emma Straub.

Type: Paperback, 293 pages Publisher: Picador, June 5, 2014 (first published in 2014) Setting: Mallorca, Spain The Vacationers by Emma Straub is probably one of the few books that I’d buy on a whim online or at the bookstore. Simply because the book’s title may have appeared online as an ad in relation to something I’ve…

Book Review: The Secret Ministry of Ag. & Fish by Noreen Riols.

My Life in Churchill’s School for Spies Type: Paperback, 320 pages Publisher: Pan, May 8, 2014 (first published in August 29, 2013) The Secret Ministry of Ag. & Fish was the first ever non-fiction memoir that I have ever read. Throughout my entire lifetime of reading, the books I’ve always read were fiction; science fiction, romance…

Book Quote of the Day: Markus Zusak.

I know, I know, it’s only Wednesday… How I wish it was Friday. How I wish the weekend was already here. So to make things better, how about a book quote from our favourite author? Well, my favourite author at least. The brilliant man and mind behind The Book Thief and I Am The Messenger.

Book Review: The President’s Hat by Antoine Laurain.

Type: Paperback, 208 pages Publisher: Gallic Books, September 3, 2013 (first published in January 11, 2012) Original Title: Le Chapeau de Mitterand When I first read The Red Notebook by Antoine Laurain, little did I know that I would be buying another two books written by him. Who would have thought that novellas could be so fun and…

Book Review: Odysseus: The Oath by Valerio Massimo Manfredi.

Type: Paperback, 372 pages Publisher: Pan Macmillan, October 1, 2013 (first published in November 6, 2012) Original Title: Il mio nome è Nessuno: Il giuramento Odysseus: The Oath was written by Valerio Massimo Manfredi and translated into English by his wife, Christine Feddersen-Manfredi. The Oath is the first book in a three-part series which also include the second book, Odysseus:…

Book Review: My Cousin Rachel by Daphne du Maurier.

Type: Paperback, 335 pages Publisher: Virago, May 1, 2013 (first published in 1951) Original Title: My Cousin Rachel Characters: Philip Ashley, Ambrose Ashley, Rachel Ashley, Signor Rainaldi, Nicholas Kendall, Louise Kendall, Father Pasco, Mrs Pascoe, Mary Pascoe, Seecombe, Tamlyn, and Wellington. So, here I am, back again with yet another book review. This time, it’s of a…

Spook Yourself Out This Halloween with These Books.

Another 5 more days and it’ll be October. How time has flown by so quickly, hasn’t it? And in a few days’ time, y’all will be preparing for the Oktoberfest and Halloween. Free flow fun, food and frolicking on the streets with pretty little ladies in skirts and pigtails. Not to mention, the beer as…

Literary Travels: Books to Bring When You’re Travelling.

Alright, I have a question for you guys. Do you often find yourself sitting on your sofa or in bed reading and daydreaming about being that character in your book? The one who’s busy exploring the world, having amazing adventures while meeting incredible people? If you said yes, then you’re just like me. I envy…

Book Review: The Red Notebook by Antoine Laurain.

Type: Paperback, 159 pages Publisher: Gallic Books, April 7, 2015 (first published on March 5, 2014) Original Title: La Femme au Carnet Rouge It took me only a week to finish reading The Red Notebook by Antoine Laurain. A week. This is by far the shortest duration I’ve ever taken to reading a book! Especially since I’m…

What’s Your Poison When You Read: Coffee, Tea or Booze?

  Once upon a time, I used to have my daily dose of caffeine in the morning, and probably another mug later on in the day when I want to read. Ever since my bowels went on strike after having a cappuccino, these days, a hot cup of freshly-brewed tea is the drink for me…

Bookshelf Management: Which Is Your Style?

  I was going through my bookshelf when I finished reading Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights by Salman Rushdie, and I noticed that my books were neither here nor there. This was before I settled on The Red Notebook by Antoine Laurain, by the way. They were arranged according to height but in terms of…

Book Review: Fates and Furies by Lauren Groff.

I’ve seen this book making its round on Tumblr for quite awhile and I figured that it must be a pretty good book, considering how so many people all over the world have begun reading it. So I started searching for it online and found that MPH Online had stock of this title. A click…

Book Review: The Little Paris Bookshop by Nina George

A little delayed but here is the long-awaited book review of The Little Paris Bookshop by Nina George that I had finally finished reading some time over the week. I must admit that the book was pretty damn amazing. Why? Because no matter how desperate I wanted to finish reading the book and keep up with my 2016 Goodreads…

Book Review: The Tea Planter’s Wife by Dinah Jefferies.

When I saw this book on the fiction shelves in Borders, I knew I must have it. The cover was attractive enough, the back of the book told me enough to know roughly what the story would be about, and also because I’ve begun drinking tea (Lipton, to be exact) more so than coffee. Of…

Book Review: The Hornet’s Nest by Jimmy Carter.

I’ll say this frankly. I’ve never been much of a history buff. I do like a bit of history here and there, but an overloaded and overwhelming truck of historical information can drive me insane. Especially if the book contains more historical facts than fiction plots. Below is the synopsis for the book by Goodreads:…

The A-Z of a Book Lover’s Glossary.

Who else agrees with me on this? That no matter where we are, it will always feel like we have been transported to a new destination whenever we pick up a book to read. I feel that way all the time when I had my nose buried between the pages of a book. Carlos Ruiz Zafon…

I Love (Big) Books, and I Cannot Lie.

Do you know what piques your interest? Do you know what tickles your fancy? Do you know what catches your eye, and makes you go “Ooh!” and “Aah!”? For me, it’s books. I love books, and I love to read. I love reading so much that when I’m in a bookstore, I can say with…

Book Review: The Mountain of Light.

I’ve often been a fan of historical fiction, but so far the titles I read under this genre were pretty gnarly and gruesome. Most of the books that I’ve read had all been based on the World War II and mainly involved either the Nazis or the Japanese. Both who were pretty sick when it…

Hardcover vs. Paperback.

So I’ve been wondering last night, after taking another look at my mini library, why I’ve never bought any hardcover books. Two shelves in my master bedroom were dedicated to a variety of titles and they were all in paperback format. Don’t get me wrong. I don’t hate hardcover books. I just find them a…

First World Reader Problems #1.

A bibliophile is defined as a “lover of books; one who loves to read, admire, and collect books.“ You can find many book lovers and avid readers on Tumblr who constantly share their readership and kinship with their books with you through their pages. I, for one, am like them, and I share the same…

Book Review: The Heart Whisperer.

I used to stay up all night in my childhood bedroom of my parents’ house, desperately trying to finish reading a book. I would continue where I last stopped at 11:00pm, and carried on reading past midnight. By the time I was done with it and finally decided to sleep, it was 4:00am. And now…

Book Review: Homecoming by Cathy Kelly.

After having tortured myself with the earlier chapters of The Splintered Kingdom by James Aitcheson, you can only imagine my relief when I decided to abandon it and start reading Homecoming by Cathy Kelly instead. This is the second book written by an Irish author, and the next book I’m about to read also happens…

Thank God It’s Friday!

Aren’t you glad it’s finally Friday, guys? After a long and hectic week at work, it’s time to head back home and relax. Like Irish author Cathy Kelly says: Sometimes the best thing to do is go home… because it’s where the heart is. Unless, of course, your version of relaxing is hitting the bar…

Book Review: The Splintered Kingdom.

I don’t often leave books unfinished but when I do, it is usually for one reason and one reason only: The story was boring. But this book wasn’t boring. No, boring was the least of my concerns. I stopped reading The Splintered Kingdom because the plot thickened so much that it was denser than my…

Book Review: Sworn Sword by James Aitcheson.

You know, I always try not to buy books that come in a series or a trilogy because I almost always never find the subsequent books that follow up with the first one. I consider myself lucky only if the bookstore or warehouse sale happens to sell all the books required in a series which,…

The Effect of Her by Gerard Stembridge.

Here’s the thing about reading: There will be a book or two that you won’t enjoy reading. And most people would tell me to stop reading it then and choose another book to read. Well, that’s where the dilemma comes in. I can’t make myself stop a reading a book the moment I start reading…