Book Review: A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman.

No. of pages: 294 pages Publisher, Date: Hodder & Stoughton Ltd., March 2015 Setting: Sweden Author: Fredrik Backman Synopsis: A grumpy yet loveable man finds his solitary world turned on its head when a boisterous young family moves in next door. Meet Ove. He’s a curmudgeon, the kind of man who points at people he dislikes…

Book Review: The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan.

No. of pages: 332 pages Publisher: Ballantine Books Published Date: 30 April 1990 Author: Amy Tan Setting: China and California, United States Synopsis Four mothers, four daughters, four families whose histories shift with the four winds depending on who’s “saying” the stories. In 1949 four Chinese women, recent immigrants to San Francisco, begin meeting to…

Book Review: Married Lovers by Jackie Collins.

No. of pages: 464 pages Publisher (Date): Pocket Books, April 16, 2009 Setting: Hollywood, Los Angeles Synopsis: Three high-powered Hollywood couples, two hot affairs, one underage Russian ex-hooker, a passionate murder—and the players’ lives are changed forever. Cameron Paradise, a stunningly beautiful twenty-four-year-old personal trainer, flees Hawaii and her champion-surfer husband, Gregg, in the middle of one…

Book Review: Odysseus: The Return by Valerio Massimo Manfredi.

No. of pages: 400 pages Publisher: Macmillan, September 11, 2014 (first published in September 10, 2013) Setting: Ancient Greece (the vast open sea and all the surrounding islands) Original Title: Il mio nome è Nessuno: Il ritorno And so Odysseus: The Return by Valerio Massimo Manfredi was my 25th book of the year 2016 and marked the…

Book Review: The Vacationers by Emma Straub.

Type: Paperback, 293 pages Publisher: Picador, June 5, 2014 (first published in 2014) Setting: Mallorca, Spain The Vacationers by Emma Straub is probably one of the few books that I’d buy on a whim online or at the bookstore. Simply because the book’s title may have appeared online as an ad in relation to something I’ve…

Book Review: The President’s Hat by Antoine Laurain.

Type: Paperback, 208 pages Publisher: Gallic Books, September 3, 2013 (first published in January 11, 2012) Original Title: Le Chapeau de Mitterand When I first read The Red Notebook by Antoine Laurain, little did I know that I would be buying another two books written by him. Who would have thought that novellas could be so fun and…

Literary Travels: Books to Bring When You’re Travelling.

Alright, I have a question for you guys. Do you often find yourself sitting on your sofa or in bed reading and daydreaming about being that character in your book? The one who’s busy exploring the world, having amazing adventures while meeting incredible people? If you said yes, then you’re just like me. I envy…

Book Review: The Hornet’s Nest by Jimmy Carter.

I’ll say this frankly. I’ve never been much of a history buff. I do like a bit of history here and there, but an overloaded and overwhelming truck of historical information can drive me insane. Especially if the book contains more historical facts than fiction plots. Below is the synopsis for the book by Goodreads:…

I Love (Big) Books, and I Cannot Lie.

Do you know what piques your interest? Do you know what tickles your fancy? Do you know what catches your eye, and makes you go “Ooh!” and “Aah!”? For me, it’s books. I love books, and I love to read. I love reading so much that when I’m in a bookstore, I can say with…

Drama Kings and Queens.

Growing up, I never had the opportunity to watch many television series, despite some of them winning a number of Golden Globes and Oscar awards. I had a curfew to adhere to when I was growing up. Completion of school work and assignments at a certain time, helping out with household chores at a particular…

Book Review: Summerland by Elin Hilderbrand.

A lot has happened over the past week, with yours truly putting pen to paper and signing the release of my employment and termination of my contract at my current job. That was no easy feat (mentally and emotionally, that is). Not that I wanted it to happen, though. I was clearly and very much…

Book Review: A Summer Affair.

First, I’d like to extend my gratitude and relief for the introduction of Canva into my blogging life. With this free content software tool, I can now create and design just about anything for my blog. And never again do I have to “borrow” images from other websites. Though, I still do that from time…

Book Review: The Incarnations by Susan Barker.

A taxi driver husband (Wang Jun) who has a stalker hanging on to his coattails. A masseuse for a wife (Yida) whose hands provide pleasure of the flesh for a living. A daughter (Echo) who takes neither pride in her parents’ lives nor pleasure in her education. A father (Wang Hu) whose ego took a…

Book Review: Landline by Rainbow Rowell.

If you found a magic telephone in your closet, attic or store room, and it allows you to turn back time. Which means that you have the chance to go back into the past and meet your teenaged self to right the wrongs of your life, would you take it? If yes, which areas of…

Book Review: The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah.

Two sisters. One must be brave. The other should be afraid. Be very, very afraid. After all, it is World War II and in wars, nothing good ever comes out of it. Unless we’re talking about the benefits that the enemies are getting at the expense of the victims. Synopsis: “FRANCE, 1939: In the quiet…